Stressor: 36

Title

To create a new stressor, from the Listing Stressors page at https://aopwiki.org/stressors click ‘New stressor.’ This will bring you to a page entitled “New Stressor” where a stressor title can be entered. Click ‘Create stressor’ to create a new Stressor page listing the stressor title at the top. More help

Mercury

Stressor Overview

The stressor field is a structured data field that can be used to annotate an AOP with standardised terms identifying stressors known to trigger the MIE/AOP. Most often these are chemical names selected from established chemical ontologies. However, depending on the information available, this could also refer to chemical categories (i.e., groups of chemicals with defined structural features known to trigger the MIE). It can also include non-chemical stressors such as genetic or environmental factors. More help

AOPs Including This Stressor

This table is automatically generated and lists the AOPs associated with this Stressor. More help

Events Including This Stressor

This table is automatically generated and lists the Key Events associated with this Stressor. More help

Chemical Table

The Chemical Table lists chemicals associated with a stressor. This table contains information about the User’s term for a chemical, the DTXID, Preferred name, CAS number, JChem InChIKey, and Indigo InChIKey.To add a chemical associated with a particular stressor, next to the Chemical Table click ‘Add chemical.’ This will redirect you to a page entitled “New Stressor Chemical.’ The dialog box can be used to search for chemical by name, CAS number, JChem InChIKey, and Indigo InChIKey. Searching by these fields will bring forward a drop down list of existing stressor chemicals formatted as  Preferred name, “CAS- preferred name,” “JChem InChIKey – preferred name,” or “Indigo InChIKey- preferred name,” depending on by which field you perform the search. It may take several moments for the drop down list to display. Select an entity from the drop down list and click ‘Add chemical.’ This will return you to the Stressor Page, where the new record should be in the ‘Chemical Table’ on the page.To remove a chemical associated with a particular stressor, in the Chemical Table next to the chemical you wish to delete, click ‘Remove’ and then click 'OK.' The chemical should no longer be visible in the Chemical table. More help
User term DTXID Preferred name Casrn jchem_inchi_key indigo_inchi_key
Mercury DTXSID1024172 Mercury 7439-97-6 QSHDDOUJBYECFT-UHFFFAOYSA-N QSHDDOUJBYECFT-UHFFFAOYSA-N

AOP Evidence

This table is automatically generated and includes the AOPs with this associated stressor as well as the evidence term and evidence text from this AOP Stressor. More help

Event Evidence

This table is automatically generated and includes the Events with this associated stressor as well as the evidence text from this Event Stressor. More help
Binding, SH-/selen-proteins

There is no evidence text for this event.

Decreased protection against oxidative stress

There is no evidence text for this event.

Increase, Oxidative Stress

Belyaeva et al. (2012) conducted a study which looked at the effects of mercury on human kidney cells, they found that mercury was the most toxic when the sample was treated with 100 μM for 30 minutes.

Buelna-Chontal et al. (2017) investigated the effects of mercury on rat kidneys and found that treated rats had higher lipid peroxidation content and reduced cytochrome c content in their kidneys.

Occurrence, Kidney toxicity

In their study investigating the effect of mercury treatment on rat kidneys, Buelna-Chontal et al. (2017) observed severe proximal tubular necrosis in the treated rats, which was not observed in the control rats. They also found that serum urea nitrogen was 5 times higher in the treated rats, serum creatinine was 3 times higher, and creatinine clearance was 52% lower (Buelna-Chontal et al., 2017).

Durante et al. (2010) conducted a study of the effect of mercury on the histological changes to rat kidneys when treated for increasing lengths of time. In their study, they found that within 24 hours of treatment the amount of necrosis shown in the kidney samples increased to 97% from 0% in the control. The LDH content after 24 hours of mercury treatment was 3 times higher than the untreated control group. Treatment with mercury for 48 hours, showed lessened histological changes in the kidney samples but LDH levels remained high, implying necrosis was still occuring. Durante et al. (2010) also investigated renal function in the rats treated with mercury. Plasma creatinine showed a time-dependant increase, as did blood urea nitrogen (Durante et al., 2010).

Oxidative Stress

Belyaeva et al. (2012) conducted a study which looked at the effects of mercury on human kidney cells, they found that mercury was the most toxic when the sample was treated with 100 μM for 30 minutes.

Buelna-Chontal et al. (2017) investigated the effects of mercury on rat kidneys and found that treated rats had higher lipid peroxidation content and reduced cytochrome c content in their kidneys.

Increase, Cytotoxicity (renal tubular cell)

Belyaeva et al. (2012) conducted a study to determine the effect of mercury treatment on rat kidney cell (PC12 cells) viability and found that treatment with 50 μM of mercury for 24 hours resulted in significant lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release.

Stressor Info

Text sections under this subheading include the Chemical/Category Description and Characterization of Exposure. More help
Chemical/Category Description
To edit the Chemical/Category Description” section, on a KER page, in the upper right hand menu, click ‘Edit.’ This brings you to a page entitled, “Editing Stressor.”  Scroll down to the “Chemical/Category Description” section, where a text entry box allows you to submit text. Click ‘Update’ to save your changes and return to the Stressor page.  The new text should appear under the “Chemical/Category Description”  section on the page. More help
Characterization of Exposure
To edit the “Characterization of Exposure” section, on a Stressor page, in the upper right hand menu, click ‘Edit.’ This brings you to a page entitled, “Editing Stressor.”  Scroll down to the “Characterization of Exposure”  section, where a text entry box allows you to submit text. Click ‘Update’ to save your changes and return to the Stressor page.  The new text should appear under the “Characterization of Exposure” section on the page. More help

References

List of the literature that was cited for this Stressor description. Ideally, the list of references, should conform, to the extent possible, with the OECD Style Guide (https://www.oecd.org/about/publishing/OECD-Style-Guide-Third-Edition.pdf) (OECD, 2015).To edit the “References” section, on a Stressor page, in the upper right hand menu, click ‘Edit.’ This brings you to a page entitled, “Editing Stressor.”  Scroll down to the “References” section, where a text entry box allows you to submit text. Click ‘Update’ to save your changes and return to the Stressor page.  The new text should appear under the “References” section on the page. More help