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Event: 859

Key Event Title

A descriptive phrase which defines a discrete biological change that can be measured. More help

Decreased, Peroxisomal Fatty Acid Beta Oxidation of Fatty Acids

Short name
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Decreased, Peroxisomal Fatty Acid Beta Oxidation of Fatty Acids
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Biological Context

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Level of Biological Organization
Molecular

Cell term

The location/biological environment in which the event takes place.The biological context describes the location/biological environment in which the event takes place.  For molecular/cellular events this would include the cellular context (if known), organ context, and species/life stage/sex for which the event is relevant. For tissue/organ events cellular context is not applicable.  For individual/population events, the organ context is not applicable.  Further information on Event Components and Biological Context may be viewed on the attached pdf. More help
Cell term
hepatocyte

Organ term

The location/biological environment in which the event takes place.The biological context describes the location/biological environment in which the event takes place.  For molecular/cellular events this would include the cellular context (if known), organ context, and species/life stage/sex for which the event is relevant. For tissue/organ events cellular context is not applicable.  For individual/population events, the organ context is not applicable.  Further information on Event Components and Biological Context may be viewed on the attached pdf. More help

Key Event Components

The KE, as defined by a set structured ontology terms consisting of a biological process, object, and action with each term originating from one of 14 biological ontologies (Ives, et al., 2017; https://aopwiki.org/info_pages/2/info_linked_pages/7#List). Biological process describes dynamics of the underlying biological system (e.g., receptor signalling).Biological process describes dynamics of the underlying biological system (e.g., receptor signaling).  The biological object is the subject of the perturbation (e.g., a specific biological receptor that is activated or inhibited). Action represents the direction of perturbation of this system (generally increased or decreased; e.g., ‘decreased’ in the case of a receptor that is inhibited to indicate a decrease in the signaling by that receptor).  Note that when editing Event Components, clicking an existing Event Component from the Suggestions menu will autopopulate these fields, along with their source ID and description.  To clear any fields before submitting the event component, use the 'Clear process,' 'Clear object,' or 'Clear action' buttons.  If a desired term does not exist, a new term request may be made via Term Requests.  Event components may not be edited; to edit an event component, remove the existing event component and create a new one using the terms that you wish to add.  Further information on Event Components and Biological Context may be viewed on the attached pdf. More help
Process Object Action
fatty acid beta-oxidation fatty acid decreased

Key Event Overview

AOPs Including This Key Event

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Taxonomic Applicability

Latin or common names of a species or broader taxonomic grouping (e.g., class, order, family) that help to define the biological applicability domain of the KE.In many cases, individual species identified in these structured fields will be those for which the strongest evidence used in constructing the AOP was available in relation to this KE. More help
Term Scientific Term Evidence Link
Homo sapiens Homo sapiens High NCBI
Mus musculus Mus musculus High NCBI
Rattus rattus Rattus rattus High NCBI

Life Stages

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Sex Applicability

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Term Evidence
Male High
Female High

Key Event Description

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PPARα acts as a positive transcriptional regulator for many of the genes involved in peroxisomal fatty acid beta oxidation as well as genes involved in the pre- and post-processing of fatty acids in peroxisomal pathways (Desvergne and Wahili 1999, Kersten 2014).  Thus, decreased PPARα nuclear signaling results in decreased transcriptional expression of genes that are regulated by PPARα, and subsequently, decreased expression of the coded proteins and enzymes that ultimately decrease fatty acid metabolism within the peroxisome.

Genes Involved:  The first gene target identified for PPARα was Acyl-CoA oxidase (Acox1, Dreyer et al 1992) which represents the first enzyme in peroxisomal long-chain fatty acid oxidation (Kersten 2014) and is also the rate-limiting enzyme in this pathway (Desvergne and Wahili 1999).  In addition to Acox1, a variety of additional enzymes involved in peroxisomal fatty acid metabolism are under transcriptional control of PPARα transactivation including enzymes that facilitate fatty acid uptake into the peroxisome (Abcd1, Abcd2 and Abcd 3), conversion of acyl-CoA/acetyl-CoA to acyl-carnitine/acetyl-carnitine (Crot/Crat), and conversion of acyl-CoAs back to fatty acids via thioesterases (Acots, as reviewed in Kersten 2014).  PPARalpha also has transcriptional control over enzymes downstream of Acox1 in the peroxisomal beta-oxidation of acyl-CoA pathway including L-bifunctional enzyme (Ehhadh), D-bifunctional enzyme (Hsd17b4), and peroxisomal 3-ketoacyl-CoA thiolase activity (Acaa1a, Acaa1b, as reviewed in Kersten 2014).  All of these genes are potential targets for screening affects within this KE.

Metabolism Affected:  Peroxisomes participate in a variety of lipid metabolic pathways including the beta-oxidation of very long-straight chain (<20 C in length) or branched –chain acyl-CoAs (Lazarow 1978, Kersten 2014).  The peroxisomal beta-oxidation pathway is not directly coupled to the electron transport chain and oxidative phosporylation, therefore the first oxidation reaction loses energy to heat (H2O2 production) while in the second step, energy is captured in the metabolically accessible form of high-energy electrons in NADH (Mannaerts and Van Veldhoven 1993, Desvergne and Wahli 1999).  The peroxisomal beta-oxidation pathway provides fatty acid chain shortening where two carbons are removed in each round of oxidation in the form of acetyl-CoA (Desvergne and Wahli 1999).  The acetyl-CoA monomers serve as fundamental units for metabolic energy production (ATP)  via the citric acid cycle followed by electron-transport chain mediated oxidative phosphorylation (Nelson and Cox, 2000A) as well as serve as the fundamental units for energy storage via gluconeogenesis (Nelson and Cox, 2000B) and lipogenesis (Nelson and Cox, 2000C).  The shortened chain fatty acids (<20C) can then be transported to the mitochondria to undergo mitochondrial beta-oxidation for complete metabolism of the carbon substrate for cellular energy production (Desvergne and Wahli 1999).

How It Is Measured or Detected

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A variety of transcript expression assays have been used to demonstrate the effect of PPARα signaling inhibition on downstream transcript expression (see literature cited above for specific methods within each investigation).  Investigation of PPARα transcriptional targets (especially those involved in fatty acid metabolism) have been conducted via variety of methods, with RT-qPCR being the benchmark standard (Kersten 2014, Rakhshandehroo et al 2007).  Spectroscopic analysis of the characteristic absorption bands for fatty acid substrates and fatty acid beta oxidation products were examined for peroxisomal fractions purified from rat livers by differential and of equilibrium density centrifugation (Lazarow 1978).  Additionally, NAD reduction assays were conducted for acyl-CoA substrates with varying chain lengths where increased oxidation was observed for substrates with long chain length relative to short chain acyl-CoAs (Lazarow 1978).

Domain of Applicability

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Human (as reviewed in Kersten 2014 and Desvergne and Wahli 1999). Rat (as measured by Lazarow 1978). Mouse (as reviewed in Kersten 2014 and Desvergne and Wahli 1999).

References

List of the literature that was cited for this KE description. More help

Desvergne B, Wahli W (1999) Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors: nuclear control of metabolism. Endocrine Reviews 20(5): 649-688.

Kersten S. 2014. Integrated physiology and systems biology of PPARalpha. Molecular Metabolism 2014, 3(4):354-371.

Lazarow PB: Rat liver peroxisomes catalyze the beta oxidation of fatty acids. J Biol Chem 1978, 253(5):1522-1528.

Mannaerts GP, Van Veldhoven PP 1993 Metabolic role of mammalian peroxisomes. In: Gibson G, Lake B (eds) Peroxisomes: Biology and Importance in Toxicology and Medicine. Taylor & Francis, London, pp 19–62.

Nelson DL, Cox MM 2000A. The Citric Acid Cycle. Lehninger Principles of Biochemistry. 3rd Edition. Worth Publishers. New York, NY. p567-592.

Nelson DL, Cox MM 2000B. Carbohydrate Biosynthesis. Lehninger Principles of Biochemistry. 3rd Edition. Worth Publishers. New York, NY. p722-764.

Nelson DL, Cox MM 2000C. Lipid Biosynthesis. Lehninger Principles of Biochemistry. 3rd Edition. Worth Publishers. New York, NY. p770-814.